Monthly Archives: January 2012

2011 Year in Review, the Uhm, Other Stuff – SWBTF #4

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Welcome back to Star Wars Beyond the Films!

On this last 2011 year in review, Mark and Nathan discuss ebooks, video games, and the state of Star Wars. (Or is it E-books, eBooks or Ebooks?) Nathan enjoys Ebooks, and among those talked about in this episode was Lost Tribe of the Sith. Did you guys enjoy reading it? Or are eBooks not your thing?

They talk about Star Wars video games, and the fact that the MMO landscape has changed. The end of one era….

… and the beginning of a new one.

Nathan is rather burned out with Star Wars Lego games, but Mark still enjoys playing them with his son.

 

Did you know that “Bad purchases lead to anger, anger leads to hate, hate leads to the end!” You don’t want to turn into an evil wizard, do you? Do you!?

They talk about Star Tours!

They talk about all this and more! Enjoy listening!

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Sci-Fi Expo Coming to Dallas, Texas!

C2 Ventures, Inc.

Lewisville, Texas

 

Press Release

TV Stars Top the Bill at Upcoming Sci-Fi Expo

 

Fans of Dollhouse, Firefly, Angel, Stargate and Battlestar Galactica can meet some of their favorite stars from those and other shows during the upcoming Sci-Fi Expo on Feb. 11 and 12 at the new Irving Convention Center in Irving, Texas. Comic fans won’t be left out in the cold either with a variety of artists showing their work in Artists’ Alley.

This is the third convention Dallas Comic Con’s producers have hosted at the center since it opened last spring.

“We’re really happy to bring our sci-fi-themed show to this beautiful new facility,” said producer Ben Stevens. “With 300,000 square feet at our disposal, the Irving Convention Center provides room to spread out and really grow, and the fans have told us they really love our new ‘home’ as well.”

Topping the Sci-Fi Expo’s guest list is Eliza Dushku, star of Dollhouse, Buffy and Angel, as well as numerous movies, including True Lies, Bring It On and Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back. Ms. Dushku will be greeting fans and signing autographs on Saturday only, as will Adam Baldwin. Mr. Baldwin starred in the 1987 movie Full Metal Jacket, recently played “Agent John Casey” on the TV show Chuck, and was in The X-Files and Firefly series.

Appearing Saturday and Sunday are three additional actors from the popular Firefly series, including Jewel Staite, also a regular on Stargate Atlantis; Sean Maher, who recently appeared in The Playboy Club TV show; and Ron Glass. Mr. Glass also appeared in Star Trek Voyager and first found fame as Det. Ron Harris in the popular 1970s sitcom, Barney Miller.

Other media guests appearing both days are Alexis Cruz of the Stargate movie; James Hampton of F-Troop and Teen Wolf fame; Noah Hathaway, best known as “Boxey” on the classic Battlestar Galactica TV series; and Angie Bolling, who played Ellen in the Robocop movies. Also, stunt performer Alina Andrei, whose work includes The Office, CSI: NY and Dexter.

Comic fans will find more than a dozen top-notch artists at the Sci-Fi Expo, including Eisner award-winning artist Bill Sienkiewicz of Elektra: Assassin, Fantastic Four, New Mutants and Moon Night fame. Also, Bernie Wrightson, legendary co-creator and artist of Swamp Thing; Joe Jusko, award-winning cover artist of Marvel Masterpieces trading cards, and fan favorite Mark Brooks, Marvel artist of Amazing Spider-Man.

In addition to meeting the actors and artists, fans are invited to attend Q&A sessions with the guests at no additional charge. They also can peruse more than 200 exhibitors’ booths featuring comic books, movie memorabilia, old and new toys, clothing and other merchandise. For an additional fee, fans may have their photo taken with select actors by a professional photographer.

Admission to the Sci-Fi Expo varies depending on level purchased.

VIP passes ($60) give customers admission to the show 30 minutes prior to other ticket holders, first access to the autograph area, and first seating in the Q&A sessions. Passes are good Saturday and Sunday with a limited number available.

Priority passes ($40) also are limited in number, allow customers into autograph areas ahead of general admission, and are good Saturday and Sunday. One-day General admission is $15. Admission for children ages 5-12 is $5 when accompanied by a paid adult; children’s passes are good both days.

Hours are 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 11, and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 12. The Irving Convention Center, 500 W. Las Colinas Blvd., is at the intersection of SH114 and Northwest Highway in Irving, Texas.

For more information or to order advance tickets, please visit the website at www.scifiexpo.com.

 

Darth Maul’s Return to Star Wars in The Clone Wars: Spoilers & Speculation

“Far above, far above,
We don’t know where we’ll fall.
Far above, far above,
What once was great is rendered small.”

Unless you have been living under a rock you know that Darth Maul will be returning to The Clone Wars for the final story arc of Season Four.  This may leave you scratching your head as to how the bisected Sith Lord could have survived his unkind cut at the hands of Obi-Wan and his even less kind fall down the reactor shaft.

Thankfully, Ryder Windham gave us a little sneak peak behind the story of Darth Maul in the new young reader book by Scholastic, Star Wars: The Wrath of Darth Maul.

What follows will be spoilers revealed as to Darth Maul’s fate as well as my speculation about how it will play out on the small screen.

SPOILERS BELOW

While it is a “kids” book, Ryder Windham’s work covers previously explored territory in Darth Maul’s back story as well as adding new material to what we know about the Sith Lord.   This of course includes The Phantom Menace film, but also the TPM novelization by Terry Brooks, the Darth Maul Journal by Jude Watson, the Darth Plagueis novel and short story “Restraint” by James Luceno, and notably for our purposes in this article, story elements from the Clone Wars episode “Brothers” which, like last season’s “Nightsisters” arc, was written by Katie Lucas.

We all know how we thought Darth Maul’s story ended, but it turns out Darth Maul borrowed a few tricks from the Skywalkers.  In Empire Strikes Back, after losing his duel with Darth Vader, Luke Skywalker allowed  himself to fall down and managed to find a shaft to slide into ending up hanging underneath Cloud City where he was rescued by Princess Leia, Lando and Chewie.  Well it turns out that Darth Maul managed to find an air vent while he was falling down the reactor core.  But how did he manage to do this?  Well it turns out the Dark Side has a few tricks up it’s sleeve.  Think back to Episode III as Darth Vader is laying maimed on the shore of a Mustafar river of fire, as his skin catches fire and he begins to burn, it is only his strength of will and his hatred in that moment of Obi-Wan Kenobi that keeps him alive.  It turns out that Darth Maul used his hatred and the Dark Side to clear is clouded and failing mind as shock and a head wound threatened to banish him to the perpetual darkness of death.

Darth Maul decided he must live for one singular purpose, to kill Obi-Wan Kenobi.  Revenge.

In this book we learn that Maul, or at least what used to be Maul is alive on the planet Lotho Minor.  We also learn that Maul or someone else fashioned for him out of scraps a mechanical carriage that began just below his rib cage and was attached to six metal legs each of which ended in a point.  These legs were constructed out of ruined droids. Will Maul’s legs look like one of the BT-16 droids that were used by the B’omarr monks ?

Maul has been living in this subterranian area of Lotho Minor in this bestial state for approximately a decade, whether from the trauma of his ordeal or a brain injury he has no memories and is eeking out a miserable existence on what scraps of food he can find or catch.

It was in this hole on Lotho Minor that Savage Opress will ultimately discover his brother.  In the Season Three episode “Witches of the Mist”  Mother Talzin reveals to Savage Opress the existence of his brother Darth Maul and gives him a Talisman with which to track him down.  How this talisman works is revealed by Windham.  Readers of the two most recent EU series, Legacy of the Force and Fate of the Jedi will be familiar with a new Force technique that was introduced and has since been re-used.  The Dathomiri Blood Trail.  Wookieepedia has a description of the technique which reads in part:

A blood trail was a Force technique developed by the Nightsisters of Dathomir. With this technique, the Nightsister would use her own blood to mark her target (often a slave) and track them through the blood mark using the Force in case they escaped. The shed blood used for a blood trail could not be removed once the trail was set. http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/Blood_trail

In the The Wrath of Darth Maul, Maul has an encounter with Mother Talzin in which she has the talisman and brushes it against a wound of his in passing.  When she did so she annointed the talisman with some of Maul’s blood.  What was the purpose of her doing so?  She had just learned that Maul was claimed by Sidious and had deferred to Sidious’ superior power.  Presumably she wanted a way to keep tabs on this would be Nightbrother (in Maul) that got away, in case Sidious cast aside his apprentice.  What is clear is that while this isn’t exactly the same technique as the Blood Trail there is clearly a related technique involved here.

The book closes with some interesting events, after winning Maul’s tentative trust Opress gives Maul the talisman which magically restored some of his memories, just how many memories and how much damage was repaired to Maul’s fractured psyche remains to be seen.  What happens next is that Opress and Maul head back to Dathomir to seek Mother Talzin’s aid and the use of her magics to help restore Maul to some semblence of health.  In the Epilogue we see Maul musing about how nice it would be to have a new set of legs, which seems like it may be possible given how strong the magic of the Nightsisters is, they were able to fashion an enchanted Vibro-ax out of the ground for Opress, after all.   The book  closes with a rather dramatic final pair of sentences, which sets up Maul as a rather loose cannon;

He hoped Opress was indeed his friend.  Everyone else could burn.

It is here that the book ends and the remainder of Maul’s story is set to unfurl this Spring in the animated series.

There is one major plot point that is left blank in this story.  How did he get to Lotho Minor and who partially rebuilt him?

He had no recolloection of how he’d lost his lower body or who had grafted his torso to the droid carraige…How had he arrived at this place?  How long had he been living like a wild animal? (pg.2-3)

This is where we enter the realm of speculation.  There are four main possibilities.  The first is the least likely, that in his amnesiatic state, Maul managed to scrounge and build his new spider half himself and somehow get aboard a ship that traveled from Naboo to Lotho Minor, where upon he stumbled his way in the tunnels and could not find his way out.  This is far fetched for a number of reasons that seem self evident.  The second possibility is that some as yet unknown character or group rescued Maul and then abandoned him to his fate on Lotho Minor.  This seems like a weird and pointless possibility.  The third possibility is that Mother Talzin used the talisman to keep track of Maul and sensed that something happened, she traveled in secret to Naboo and spirited away the half of Maul that remained, fashioned him a crude mechanism to move about and left him marooned on Lotho Minor for some unknown reason.

The fourth possibility seems the most likely.  Just as Darth Sidious sensed Anakin was in trouble on Mustafar and rushed to his aid, it seems likely that Sidious sensed what occured to Maul on Naboo.  James Luceno’s novel “Darth Plagueis” doesn’t seem to fit in with this theory, but to me it is the one that makes the most sense.  Sidious was dissappointed in the weakness of Maul for his failure and allowing himself to be defeated by Obi-Wan and no longer felt Maul was a worthy apprentice.  Sidious, however, is hardly one to waste a resource or to take any chances, so without restoring Maul’s mind, he simply fashioned him a crude spider body and left him on Lotho Minor.  A sort of in case of emergency break glass, Sith agent.  This would fit in with the way that Sidious remade General Greivous as well as Darth Vader into creatures that were, to quote Obi-Wan, “more machine then man.” We also know that Sidious in the guise of Palpatine may have already been on Naboo, because he was present in Theed for the funeral of Qui-Gon Jinn in the closing scenes of TPM.

All that being said it leaves the question of how The Clone Wars is going to incorporate Maul’s backstory into the series.  The only episode that Windham specifically mentioned was the episode entitled “Brothers,” this is the third episode in the Maul arc, the entire arc consisting of Massacre(4.19), Bounty (4.20), Brothers (4.21), and Revenge (4.22).  So it seems likely that Opress will not actually find Maul until Brothers, but the question is will we see dual story telling going on in the first two episodes of the arc, or will the backstory of Maul’s survival be told much like Asajj Ventress’ backstory was told in the Nightsisters Trilogy?  If I was betting money, seeing as how it is the same writer (Katie Lucas), I would say that we get Maul’s survival shown as flashbacks while Mother Talzin and the Nightsisters are working their magics on Maul.

How do you think TCW will handle Maul’s ressurection? Are you as excited as I am to see him? Let us know in the comment section below.

~Pete

 

“I ate them! I ate them all!!” – SWR #30

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Welcome back to the Star Wars Report podcast!

On this episode of the Star Wars Report, we talked a little bit about the last episode, and fallout from the RANT OF DOOM! (It wasn’t really a rant of doom, but I’ve always wanted to use the word ‘doom’ in one of these posts. Also, beware clicking on the fiery image of doom below, something might happen!)

We also talked about goal setting, and some of our goals for the Star Wars Report.

We mentioned Ewan McGregor’s surprise upon learning that the Phantom Menace was being re-released in 3D.

Sam Witwer was a zombie soldier in The Walking Dead!?

Sadly, Bob Anderson died at the age of 89, after contributing to some of the best known movie franchises in the world.

On a more upbeat note, the world has gone to the dogs, and the dogs have gone to the Bark Side!

This episode of craziness is brought to you by Toy Hutt! Your source for great Star Wars toys and action figures, games and more!

We admired two different Barriss Offee figures.

Then we discussed Underworld!

Um no, not that one. Star Wars: Underworld, the oft mentioned Star Wars live action series that’s in the works! (Which also shares the name of a little known Star Wars comic made back in the early 2000s.)

George Lucas retires? Or does he?

And finally, we discuss the burgers of the dark side, and much hilarity ensues. Thank you Eric for pointing out this story and the comments! And a thank you to all listeners who email us, we really appreciate it!

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Forum:       www.eucantina.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=1233

Darth Plagueis Commentary: Prolouge – Chapter 3

Darth Plagueis Commentary
Prologue – Chapter 3

Darth Plagueis is the type of Star Wars Expanded Universe book that begs a deeper look.  Over the next month or so we will be taking the book in parts and doing an in-depth commentary.  Various members of the Star Wars Report staff will weigh in on the discussion and maybe even some other fans as well. For this first section we will talk about the prologue and the first three chapters of the book.  I was lucky enough to get two of the hosts of the Star Wars Report podcast, Mark and Bethany, to chat with me.
Feel free to add your own commentary in the comments section below.

Note: This commentary does not give away any major spoilers from beyond chapter 3 in the book.

Aaron: So before we dig into the book, let’s talk about the hype leading up to the book.  Were you guys excited when you heard about Darth Plagueis?

Mark: Ahh hype… good old hype; by hype are we referring to the many excerpts?  Or the many reviewers that seemed to REALLY enjoy this book?

Aaron: Any hype, created by Lucasfilm or fans.

Bethany: Not really, to be honest.  I was interested to hear of the back story of the Sith, to find out more about Darth Sidious, but beyond curiosity, I didn’t feel much for the book.  Knowing that James Luceno was writing it helped, as I really enjoyed Labyrinth of Evil, which he wrote.  I became more excited about it when I heard other fans speak of how much they were enjoying it.  Peter Morrison had some really great things to say, for instance, and the Jedi Journals podcast had an interview with James Luceno (about Darth Plagueis as well as other things) that I really enjoyed listening to!

Mark: Oh yes! I was shocked that they brought a book back to life. So many cancelled books seem to have a potential to return: Blood Oath, Imperial Commando 2 and so forth.

Bethany: I wasn’t even a part of the fan community back in 2007, when, I believe, the book was first scheduled to be released, and so didn’t have that sense of surprise that you express, Mark. I do wonder what causes books to be canceled though, and simultaneously what causes them to be resurrected.

Aaron:  Was a book like Darth Plagueis a good thing or were you hoping he would stay a mysterious character?

Mark:  I was hoping beyond hope that they would do something very similar to what they did- which was give us (the reader) a great deal of insight into the character. Learning about Sidious’ early apprenticeship was an added bonus. But I’m one of those fans who enjoys learning about the mysteries. The more I learn, the MORE questions I have.  Same with this book.  I was left wanting to know even more about the past due to Plagueis’ knowledge base.

Aaron: In the media materials sent out with the advanced copies of the book they included the statement “This book is canon” and that the book does not conflict with GL’s vision.  Do you think this is an important statement or should we just see it as advertising hype?  Is this book any more canon than other Star Wars Expanded Universe books?

Mark: It all hangs on the honesty of the statement. I mean, if George did have a hand it would be one thing. But if this book had no more or less involvement than any other Del Rey book well I’d say it was advertising hype. I mean I didn’t buy it, but I still recall the many who bought DLC content because they were told it was exclusive and couldn’t be bought anywhere else.
But that’s not to say that when I saw the comment I didn’t stop and take pause. For if it is true- as I hope and try to believe it is- then that means that this IS the direction George wants the back story to take. And that’s my issue with the mystery. Leave it a mystery until GL says ok play. Don’t spell out the mystery of something George is about to do himself. That would be a set up to failure. Which isn’t the case here. Darth Plagueis manages to make you once again unlearn what you have learned in a very CLASSIC Lucas style.

Bethany: Is this book any more canon than other books?  More canon, less canon, canons to the left and right of them…. Canon is always a tricky topic to address. I consider it to be “more canon” than some Star Wars books, like Splinter of the Minds Eye obviously. I’d consider Darth Plagueis to be of a higher canon in that it seems to fit more seamlessly with the movies. The advance review copy I have tells us that the book is canon, that even the Maker himself was involved to some degree, and I really like that fact. Not all Star Wars books feel like Star Wars, in the traditional sense; I feel Darth Plagueis did.

Aaron: Ok, let’s get into the book now.  We get a pretty crazy opening with Sidious reveling in the power of the Dark Side after killing Plagueis. They killed the title character in the prologue! What did you think of this opening?

Mark: Oh what a Tarintino feel to that opening!  I will say I immediately went to that chapter again when I DID get to the end of the book. And it was like reading it in a whole new way. But the prologue had a very Stover’s Traitor feel to the way it was written. I loved how Sidious’s point of view on the dark side was one like his Master’s to a degree, that it’s almost sentient.

Bethany: The prologue really captured my attention! I enjoy Luceno’s dramatic, almost flowery writing style in it, and felt drawn into the book, once I adjusted to his style.

Mark: “Once I adjusted to his style” key words here- the more I review Darth Plagueis the more I realized I had no issue with the Lucenopedia because I’d long ago tuned out the RIDICULOUSLY BIG words with illogicalRogue ones.

Bethany: I didn’t feel as if they were unnecessarily big words, more like an interesting choice of words.

Aaron: The opening reminded me of the recent Star Wars book Riptide which also had a situation thet reversed in time and revisited the situation at the end of the book.
The prologue doesn’t tell us exactly when Palpatine killed Plagueis which was a nice mystery.  We knew it was going to happen, we just didn’t know when.

Aaron: So the book reverses in time and we are now at 67 BBY with Plagueis and his Bith master Tenebrous in a cave.

Mark: Or is it? Sure part one starts 67-65, but chapter one’s first words: “Forty-seven standard years before the harrowing Reign of Emperor Palpatine”

Aaron: That is kind of confusing.

Bethany: Perhaps a typo or continuity error?

Mark: I figured it was used to describe the planet, not a literal placement of the event itself.

Aaron: Did anyone else have a hard time imagining a Bith and a Muun as cool looking Sith?

Bethany: I did have a hard time picturing a Bith and a Muun as cool looking as, say, Darth Maul. I just couldn’t imagine them being a ‘phantom menace’ and striking fear into those that cross them. Eventually it was their, especially Plagueis’s, portrayal of personality and capability to do evil that had me respecting them as the Sith they truly are.

Mark: I admit a Bith Sith, the sound just rolls off the tongue. And knowing what I did about their species made me think it was a LOGICAL choice.  Very scary as we soon saw in the book.

Aaron: I agree Bethany, at the beginning I had a really hard time imagining Plagueis as an intimidating character because he was a Muun.  As the book went on though I found him very menacing no matter his species.

Mark: The Muun makes sense.  The finances the Sith would need to fund their Grand Plan.  It makes sense to have one on the Sith payroll in some fashion.

Aaron: Because of an accident, or was it sabotage, there is a cave collapse and Plagueis takes advantage of the situation and kills his master.  Was Tenebrous short changed? Did you wish he was in the book more or was the small portion we got with him enough for you guys?

Mark: Luceno in my opinion did a great job of keeping Tenebrous relevant to the story, most notably as Rugess Nome.

Bethany: I’m a very curious person, so I certainly wish we’d had the chance to learn more about Tenebrous, but at the same time wonder if the book could have handled delving into yet another Sith character. I’m not sure it could have.  The “accident” shows us just what Plagueis is capable of, very soon into the story.

Aaron: When Plagueis kills Tenebrous there was a lot of talk about midi-chlorians.  It kind of surprised me how much midi-chlorians were focused on in this book considering the negative feelings many fans have toward them.  I for one am happy they are embracing them and explaining them more.

Mark: Ditto. I do think though that Tenebrous and Plagueis got to a place where they weren’t communicating and all but replaced each other in a sense. Had they known about the others fascination with midi-chlorians imagine how things might have been!

Bethany: I actually liked hearing more about the midi-chlorians.  One reason I really liked reading this was learning so much! Like I said, I’m guilty of being curious. :) I like mystery and a sense of the divine and the supernatural in my stories, yes, but I feel the cards were played just right in the opening of Plagueis, things seemed balanced.

Mark: Did anyone else get the impression that Plagueis cared more for droids then sentients?  I felt he felt that droids at least knew their place as tools, unlike the beings of the Galaxy who were his Dejarik pieces.  His comment to the droid in chapter one got to me. “You’ve been useful droid.”

Aaron: It almost came across as an apology.  And 11-4D is basically his best friend throughout the book.

Mark:  Yes, 11-4D (well get to him later).  I found that a PROFOUND character in the EU in regards to the Sith cause, and what could be later Emperor Palpatine’s key to many things.

Aaron: With his ship destroyed, Plagueis needs to find a way off the planet.  He stows away on a ship called the Woebegone.  That poor crew had no idea what was coming.  We get introduced to a crew of varied species: a Togrutan, Kaleesh, Dresselian, Klatooinian… I had to look up what a Dresselian was.

Aaron: Anyone surprised to see a Kaleesh (Grievious’s species)?

Bethany: Not really.

Mark: Missed that the first time. I was focused on the captain and the use of words like Noob and Dumb***.  I was kind of giggling at how real the character felt.  I could see a freighter captain going on like that.

Bethany: As a person who enjoys the Star Wars EU, but hasn’t been reading it for very long, I haven’t read all that much of it. I was pleasantly surprised how seamlessly references to other species, planets, cultures, wars, civilizations, and histories were inserted.  Nothing felt all that forced to me, pun intended.  I didn’t feel a need to have a dictionary and Wookieepedia at hand as I was reading, though I do pull up Wookieepedia on occasion to look up something if it peaks my curiosity.

Aaron: I was actually really liking captain Ellin Lah. Was hoping she would survive.

Mark: I liked how Lah considered everyone on her ship equals.

Bethany: I found it interesting that Plagueis thought that the fate of the crew was a fixed destiny, once he boarded the ship. Kind of the opposite of “always in motion, the future is”.

Mark: Yes, I loved that too.  The Sith take control for sure.  They aren’t inclined to wait and see.

That is it for this first section of Darth Plagueis.  Keep an eye out for the next section of the commentary covering chapters 4-7 coming soon!
Check out these links for more opinions on the Darth Plagueis book.

Mark’s review over at EU Cantina
My review here at Star Wars Report
Pete’s review over at Lightsaber Rattling

- Aaron Goins