Tag Archives: Attack of the Clones

What Does “Choice” Have to Do With Star Wars? Part 2 – Attack of The Clones

Attack of the Clones is probably the oddball of the Star Wars saga.  It varies noticeably from other movies in that there are no main villains for most of the movie and that a large portion of the narrative is based on dialogue, but this does allow for another contemplative meditation on “choice”.
We start off where we ended last: Anakin Skywalker.  After ten years of living romantically and partially paternally barren, Anakin is rather confused.  It’s obvious from the first moment he’s on screen: he can’t believe he’s going to see Padme again and is visibly shaken.  After ten years of having a romance-sized hole in his heart Anakin finally feels that Padme will fill it.  As soon as he begins to get close to her his emotions are shown to be very turbulent.  He says rather strange things at inappropriate times to Padme and begins to rant in casual conversation.  Ever so slightly, he begins to forfeit his ability to choose, by becoming more and more controlled by his emotions as the movie continues.


This slowly builds throughout the movie and finally comes to a head on Tatooine when Anakin kills all the Tusken raiders to get revenge on the ones that killed his mother.  When he does this he completely relinquishes his ability to make the right decision for that moment and is totally ruled by unbridled malice (a.k.a. the dark side).  He allows his anger to get the best of him and allows his malicious emotions to dominate his mind for a time.  Afterwards he shows some form of regret, but with the help of Padme (talk about bad decisions) he simply replaces his anger with his love and infatuation (at that point it’s still infatuation in my opinion) for Padme.

tumblr_inline_nofsvaEeZy1sjf2gc_1280 This instance presents us with the idea that we can begin to weaken our resolve to make moral decisions and drives us deeper into impulsiveness, a vicious cycle.
Next, we see Obi-Wan Kenobi in his political escapade which by it’s nature involves an ability to curb or harness one’s emotions.  As Obi-Wan begins to track the mysterious assassin to the ends of well-known space.  He must gather all his wits and play his cards right to discover all the mystery surrounding Jango Fett.  He must make sure he does not show his emotion to Jango or any of the Kaminoans so as not to blow his cover.  This is expertly showcased in what some fans have come to refer to it as a verbal duel with Jango.  Obi-Wan sees Jango’s incriminating armor and it’s very likely that somebody like Anakin would immediately draw his saber and make his move.

Jangos_ApartmentObi-Wan, on the other hand, bides his time and waits until he can get Jango alone, and while he still fails to capture Jango he is mostly cut short by fate (or the force), and his failure was ultimately saved by the happenings on Geonosis.  One can’t help but notice the almost sharp contrast between Anakin and Obi-Wan.  Obi-Wan is very collected and makes decisions based on facts and evidence while Anakin is very impulsive and can base his decisions solely on emotion.  We even have this showcased during the scene in which Obi-Wan tells Anakin not to rescue him from his captors on Geonosis, only to alert the council so they can deal with it.  In response Anakin makes the impulsive (but still altruistic) decision to rush to his friend’s aid, only to be captured himself; such is the fate of those who don’t think things through.
In conclusion Attack of The Clones is a solemn warning to where allowing blatant impulsiveness and lack of forethought can lead.  It shows us that life can be better when we’re in control of our emotions, and make choices deliberately and not impulsively.

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Jedi Visions: Insights or Opportunities?

Jedi Visions:
Mere Insights into the Future or Opportunities to Change Course?

In the most recent episode of Star Wars Rebels, “Vision of Hope”, Ezra Bridger has visions of fighting alongside Gall Trayvis, the self-styled “Senator in Exile” who has been the source of information (or misinformation) for the Ghost’s small band of rebels.  Despite Kanan’s warning to refrain from taking the visions too literally, Ezra chooses to act upon his insights, hoping to meet and work with this man he idolizes as a celebrity among rebel insurgents.

The events that transpire during this episode of Rebels has caused speculation among fans about whether acting on visions is encouraged among the Jedi.  (Check out RebelForce Radio’s Star Wars Rebels: Declassified episode from 4 February 2015 for their discussion about Jedi visions.)  Citing Yoda’s advice to both Skywalkers in the movies, it has been asserted that using Jedi visions as a guide for action is frowned upon by the Jedi Order.

Ezra's Vision 1

From the perspective of the movies’ initial release order, our introduction to acting upon Jedi visions is during Luke’s training on Dagobah in The Empire Strikes Back.  While balancing in a handstand and levitating cargo crates and R2-D2 through the Force, Luke experiences a vision of Han and Leia suffering at Cloud City.  When Luke prepares to rush to their rescue, Yoda issues a warning: “Decide, you must, how to serve them best.  If you leave now, help them, you could, but you will destroy all for which they have fought and suffered.”


Yoda, aware of the machinations and deceptions of the Dark Side, tries to persuade Luke to choose his path based on wisdom and discretion instead of emotion and attachment.  He beseeches him to continue his training instead of hurrying away to confront unknown threats unprepared.  Obi-Wan weighs in on the discussion, warning Luke that temptation awaits him if he leaves before he is fully trained.  Adamantly, the two Jedi Masters, Luke’s mentors, sternly attempt to steer him from acting rashly as he is spurred on by his visions of his friends’ pain.  Some see this as a possible judgment against acting upon Jedi visions of the future.

Anakin's Anger

In other instances, more blatantly foreboding in its decrying reliance on Jedi visions to govern one’s actions, are Anakin’s visions of his mother’s pain on Tatooine and later of Padme’s death in Attack of the Clones and Revenge of the Sith, respectively.  Anakin’s nightmarish visions of his mother in peril causes him to leave his assigned post on Naboo in order to find and rescue Shmi from her Tusken captors.  When he discovers her, nearly dead at the abusive hands of the sand people, he erupts in a wrathful rage against the Tusken encampment, slaying men, women, and children indiscriminately.  Certainly, his willingness to allow himself to thoughtlessly follow his visions led to a growing darkness in his person — something that would manifest itself in the eventual rise of Darth Vader when he later acts on his visions of losing his wife during childbirth to the point that he betrays the Jedi Order and slaughters younglings in the temple in a vain attempt to save Padme’s life.


For those who remember these bleak examples of the dangers of allowing Jedi visions to dictate a course of action, it seems reasonable to assume that the Jedi are not only cautious when it comes to such premonitions, but even to rationalize that acting on those visions is forbidden in the Jedi Order.

That is, until we consider what was revealed in the third season of Star Wars: The Clone Wars…

TCW Assassin Fortune Cookie.001In Season 3 of The Clone Wars, Episode 7 “Assassin”, Ahsoka has visions of Aurra Sing threatening to assassinate someone.  When she tells Yoda of her dreams, he informs her that she is having premonitions which can only be seen more clearly through meditation.  In saying this, he encourages her to focus on the visions — to seek to understand what they are telling her.  When she does so, she realizes that Senator Amidala is the one who is in danger of being assassinated.  She brings news of her visions to the Senator, who insists on going ahead with her plans to go to Alderaan in spite of Ahsoka’s warning.

Ahsoka's Vision Aurra Sing

Determined to get a better understanding of what she has seen, Anakin’s padawan returns to her chambers in the Jedi Temple to continue her meditation, resulting in further confirmation that Senator Amidala’s life is in danger.  When she tells Yoda of her concerns, Yoda responds with the familiar words, “always in motion is the future”.  Similar to his direction to Luke many years later, he provides Ahsoka with a choice of whether to act upon what she has seen: “Choose you must, how to respond to your visions.”

Ahsoka Consults Yoda

As she accompanies Padme on her mission to Alderaan as additional security, she is plagued with uncertainty about her visions and how she should act upon them.  Her dilemma is punctuated by a rash response to her vision that turned out to be either misunderstood or a possible variation of the future of which Yoda spoke.  Yet, when she is convinced to act upon a vision a second time, she interrupts an assassination attempt by deflecting Aurra Sing’s shot sufficiently to save Amidala’s life.

Later, when Ahsoka realizes that the would-be assassin was about to make another attempt on the senator’s life, she prevents the second attack and enables the capture of Aurra Sing.

When Ahsoka and Senator Amidala return safely to Coruscant, Yoda congratulates Anakin’s padawan for her choice to act upon her visions in defense of the senator’s life,  “Served you well, your visions have, young padawan.”  He then encourages her to peer more deeply into the matter through her increased insight to discover more about the plot to assassinate the senator from Naboo.  The additional details she provides brings about the confession of Ziro the Hutt who was already imprisoned on Coruscant.

Although Ezra’s visions in Star Wars Rebels “Vision of Hope” turned out to be misleading, it is not a blanket condemnation against using Jedi visions to determine an appropriate course of action — rather it is an admonition to beware of allowing emotions to cloud one’s insight and discipline oneself to spend time and thought in meditation in order to better interpret one’s visions.  As Kanan teaches Ezra in the epilogue, “Visions are difficult, almost impossible to interpret,” Jedi visions do not forbid action, but are to be considered in view of the complexity of an ever-changing future.

Crystal Crisis: A Legacy Refracted

Greetings Bothans! What follows is a post about the recent Star Wars: The Clone Wars Crystal Crisis arc by friend of the Star Wars Report, Joseph Tavano! Be sure to check out Joseph’s new website RetroZap, a pop culture and narrative art site which currently has some of his thoughts on Star Wars Rebels. Without further ado, I’ll turn it over to Joseph! ~ Bethany Blanton


In 1985, there existed a fully formed concept for The Clone Wars. It was conceived entirely in my five-year-old mind. I envisioned the Jedi overrun by scores of doppelgangers sent forth by their Dark Side enemies, invading the universe and attacking the true Jedi from within. I imagined the Clone Wars to be a hall-of-mirrors nightmare across the galaxy where nothing could be trusted and danger was omnipresent.

When The Clone Wars was finally realized on screen, I was way off the mark. And yet, that’s an aspect of Star Wars I love more and more as the Galaxy Far, Far Away grows and matures. One of the best things that Lucasfilm has managed to do is to keep Star Wars moving in new directions virtually no one would have predicted. With every new installment, audiences get to cast off preconceived notions and fastidious theories for an inspired, radically unique story that is not afraid to go down roads less traveled.

Dave Filoni and the writing team of The Clone Wars kept this trailblazing spirit alive for over six seasons, chronicling the events of a three-year war that transpired in a way no one would have ever predicted. Ten years ago, we were left to assume that the wars were going to be a nonstop conflict similar to the battle on Geonosis in Attack of the Clones. Clone troopers versus battle droids. Blaster fire everywhere. Lightsabers leading the way through the fog of war. And, in their tour of duty, Anakin Skywalker and Obi-Wan Kenobi would become brothers-in-arms, inseparable throughout their legendary adventures across the galaxy.

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